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New case numbers, restrictions set to return


As COVID-19 cases continue to climb in New South Wales, the state government is considering pausing elective surgery in a bid to reduce pressure on the hospital system.
But there may be further restrictions on the table that could be signed off on as early as today in a bid to reduce infections, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

They include the closure of nightclubs, density changes for venues, no more dance floors. Standing drinking may be discouraged and some major events could be paused.

Mr Perrottet said QR codes will be introduced in retail settings from tomorrow.
Mr Perrottet said QR codes will be introduced in retail settings from tomorrow. (9News)

NSW yesterday recorded 34,994 new infections and six coronavirus-related deaths.

One of the deaths included a double vaccinated man in his 20s who had no underlying health conditions.

The five other people who died were in their 60s, 80s and 90s.

While cases dropped slightly from the record 35,054 infections seen on Wednesday hospitalisations have increased again with 1609 patients seeking treatment.

Of those, 131 are in ICU.

That’s 118 more people in hospital, and 12 more in the ICU than Wednesday.

It’s emerged paramedics warned the government “for months” hospitals would face a crisis as COVID-19 cases grow.

A NSW Ambulance attends the scene.
Paramedics warned the government “for months” hospitals would face a crisis as COVID-19 cases grow. (9News)

“Some of the worst cases we’ve seen for priority one cases are upwards of four, five and six hours for ambulances to arrive,” Australian Paramedics Association Brett Simpson said.

“These cases could be people having heart attacks, strokes and difficulties breathing.”

In a bid to reduce a surge in “trivial” 000 calls NSW Ambulance have released a confronting new commercial.

NSW Health has also urged residents to not place “any unnecessary burden on the health system.”

Edmonson Park in Sydney’s south-west has the highest active case rate in the state with 77 cases per 1000 residents, with a number of beach suburbs clocking in second.

“Yes it may happen,” Mr Perrottet told 2GB.

A number of beachside suburbs boast a high active case rate.
A number of beachside suburbs boast a high active case rate. (Today)

“Just like it happened earlier this year and last year

“There’s obviously significant pressure on the system.”



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